Day Four on the Camino Inglés
~ Miño to Betanzos, 11.28 Km (7.01 Miles)

Our day four on the Camino Inglés was another trip through the lovely Galician countryside, starting from sea level in Miño, climbing steeply, then ending at sea level in Betanzos. While this section is short, because of the elevation change, it will feel strenuous. You can easily combine this day with day three or day five, which is what we chose to do, combining day four with day five to walk onward to the albergue in Presedo. 

Only those who will risk going too far can possibly find out how far they can go.” ~ T.S. Eliot

I love this quote above, because indeed, you are able to find out from what cloth you are made, when you go on any Camino, especially the ups and downs of the English Way. The risk of going too far is always a possibility until you become aware of your own rhythms and limitations. This self-discovery is priceless! Traveling with our friend with Parkinson's, continued to make me acutely aware of not only myself, but of another and his process. Here is our day's journey. 

Maps and Stats of Day Four on the Camino Inglés

Below is our Google map of the day, fully interactive and with hotels, albergues, restaurants, cafés and supermarkets, placed on it ~ all to help you plan your own day four on the Camino Inglés! We uploaded these tracks from our actual GPS recordings for the day, so it is most accurate!

Interactive Google Map of Day Four on the English Way

Here is our elevation profile for the day. From sea level in Miño there are two significant climbs, starting at about 4.0 kilometers into the day, for a total of 378 meters (1270 feet) of accumulated climbing. Then the day finishes with a steep descent from the top at about 7.0 kilometers, when the Camino drops you down and into Betanzos, back to sea level once again. 

Elevation Profile of Day Four on the Camino Inglés, Miño to BetanzosElevation Profile of Day Four on the Camino Inglés, Miño to Betanzos

Photo-Rich Travelogue of Day Four on the Camino Inglés

We made our own breakfast at the Albergue de Peregrinos de Miño, from purchased supplies in town the evening before. It turns out that this was a wise decision. As we set off through town to join the Camino where we had left it on day three, we passed by many cafés, none of which were open as we passed, until well after 9:00 a.m. 

Here is our friend Rob, as together we headed off through the streets of Miño. The directional signs are good as you can see in the photo, below. 

Starting Out in Miño on the Rúa Pardineira on day four of the Camino InglésStarting Out in Miño on the Rúa Pardineira

We followed the directional signs, essentially straight onward through most intersections as we walked through town. As is often the case in Spanish cities, the name of the street changes, even when the direction does not. Very soon we came across this mural, below.

Just across the street from the Santiago mural is the Supermercado Coviran. It was not open at 8:00 a.m. when we walked by. 

Along the Rúa Real in Miño on day four of the Camino InglésSantiago Mural Along the Rua Real in Miño

Just past the supermarket is the Café Vidal, shown next, also not open. You can see that it is a mild uphill climb through town. 

Continue on the Rúa Real in Miño on day four of the Camino InglésContinue on the Rúa Real in Miño

After almost one kilometer of walking through town, still climbing up to this point, you come to this intersection below. From here you are leaving Miño, and you must now follow the concrete kilometer marker to turn right, down the hill towards the Lambre River. 

Right Turn Downhill Towards the River on day four of the Camino InglésRight Turn Downhill Towards the River, Río Lambre

Before you turn right, from your lofty perch above the river, if you look to your right, you can see this lookout over the river. This is the Mirador de Miño, shown below. Take a moment to peer out over the lookout and take in the wonderful view. 

Mirador de Miño on day four of the Camino InglésMirador de Miño

Just below the mirador you can see the Miño/Castro train station and the river behind it. 

Miño/Castro Train Station on Day Four of the Camino InglésMiño/Castro Train Station on Day Four of the Camino Inglés

As you descend toward the river, you can see this blue pedestrian bridge several hundred meters ahead. The Camino takes this bridge which walks you across the train tracks. 

Camino Takes the Blue Pedestrian Bridge Across the Railroad tracks on day four of the Camino InglésCamino Takes the Blue Pedestrian Bridge Across the Railroad Tracks

After 300 meters on the decent to the river and to the other side of the pedestrian bridge, you pick up the Rúa Alameda, a nicely shaded and rural road. Within a short distance, you walk by the walls of this estate, shown below. 

Walk By an Estate on the Rúa Alameda on day four of the Camino InglésWalk By an Estate on the Rúa Alameda

Farther along the street, the forest opens and you can see the Lambre River. You pass by a natural area, shown below, with a boardwalk that leads you to the Alameda Beach. 

Pass the Boardwalk to the Praia da Alameda on day four of the Camino InglésPass the Boardwalk to the Praia da Alameda

It is a pity that we did not spend much time here, as it was so lovely along the River in the spring. We walked into the hamlet called A Ponte do Porco, were this view of a boat on the river caught my eye. We were next to the Alameda Mesón, a café by the river, which was not open at 9:15 in the morning. I would have loved to have sipped a café con leche here and lingered awhile. Alas, we kept on walking. 

View of the Río Lambre on Day Four of the Camino InglésView of the Río Lambre on Day Four of the Camino Inglés

It is after about 1/2 kilometer along the Rúa Alameda, in the town of A Ponte do Porco, when we crossed under the N-651 and turned right on yet another country road, the DP-4804, shown below. 

Turn Right Onto the Rural DP-4804 on day four of the Camino InglésTurn Right Onto the Rural DP-4804
Cross Under the E-1 Along the DP-4804 by the Lambre River on day four of the Camino InglésCross Under the E-1 along the DP-4804 by the Lambre River
Continue on the DP-4804 on day four of the Camino InglésContinue on the DP-4804

It is a full 1.5 kilometers along the DP-4804 and the walk is relatively flat. After this distance, you are directed to turn right, off the road and onto this medieval bridge, below. 

Rich, Rob and Steve Cross the Río Lambre on Old Bridge on day four of the Camino InglésRich, Rob and Steve Cross the Río Lambre on Old Bridge
Ancient Road Across the Río Lambre on day four of the Camino InglésAncient Road Across the Río Lambre

From the moment you cross the bridge, it is uphill from there, beginning the first steep climb of the day toward the next town of Lambre. 

On the Road to Lambre on Day Four of the Camino InglésOn the Road to Lambre on Day Four of the Camino Inglés
Beautiful Horreo in Lambre ~ Half Way Up the ClimbBeautiful Horreo in Lambre ~ Half Way Up the Climb

You have reached the top of the first steep climb in about 3/4 kilometer from the bridge, when you reach this house shown below. 

Top of First Steep Climb Aldea Trasmil on day four of the Camino InglésTop of First Steep Climb on the Aldea Trasmil

In 100 meters onward, as the Camino now descends, we walked by this interesting old home. I had the guys pose here, in the hamlet of Trasmil

Rob, Rich and Steve by Old Structure in Trasmil on day five of the English WayRob, Rich and Steve by Old Structure in Trasmil

Just beyond the old house above, you come to this very interesting and eye-catching old wood shed, where you turn right on another paved country road.

Turn Right at Quaint Woodshed on Day four of the Camino InglésTurn Right at Quaint Woodshed on Day Four, Camino Inglés

In less than 1/2 kilometer you descend farther and join the N-651, shown here.

The Camino Joins the N-651 on day four of the Camino InglésThe Camino Joins the N-651

However, it is only a brief jaunt of 100 meters along the N-651, before taking a turn to the left to join this narrow road, shown below. And thus begins the second long and steep climb of day four on the Camino Inglés.

Left Turn Onto Lane ~ Begin Second steep Climb on day four of the Camino InglésLeft Turn Onto Lane ~ Begin Second steep Climb
Rich Climbing on Steep Lane on day four of the Camino InglésRich Climbing on Steep Lane

The Way climbs steeply for about 2/3 kilometer, until this short reprieve at the halfway point on day four of the Camino Inglés.  

Elle at Halfway Point on day five of the Camino InglésElle at Halfway Point

We ambled along in this lovely flat area, by the flower petals, turning right just beyond the building in the middle of the photo. 

Camellia Petals Line the Road on day four of the Camino InglésCamellia Petals Line the Road

For about 1/2 kilometer more, it was relatively flat until the 69 kilometer marker, shown below, where the second half of the steep climb begins. 

Second Half of Steep Climb Begins at 69 Kilometer Marker on day four of the English WaySecond Half of Steep Climb Begins at 69 Kilometer Marker

I ran ahead to photograph the guys from above. You can see how hard they are working with their heads down!

The Guys Climbing With Heads Down on day four of the English WayThe Guys Climbing With Heads Down

This part of the climb takes you through a lovely eucalyptus forest. 

Climb Through Eucalyptus Forest on day four of the English WayClimb Through Eucalyptus Forest
The Steep Climb Still Ahead on day four of the English WayThe Steep Climb Still Ahead

And finally in 1.3 kilometers more, your climb is rewarded by this sweeping view at the top! From our high shelf, we could see the views of the river below and miles and  miles of countryside. It is a total of almost 2.0 full kilometers of climbing from the N-651. We paused to enjoy the view over the Ría de Betanzos, slow our breath and feel worthy of the climb. We had all done well!

Arrival at the Top! on day four of the English WayArrival at the Top! On Day Four of the Camino Inglés

After this open top, it is all downhill from here to Betanzos!

After the top, you are now arriving into the municipality of Souto Gas, as a sign along the way soon announces. Just 1/2 kilometer onward from the top, is the historic fountain, with an 1884 date written on it. You can fill up your water system here. It is also a cool and shady place to rest if needed!

Fonte de Gas on day four of the English WayFonte de Gas ~ Potable Water

The next hamlet that you walk through is San Paio. Here is Rich and Rob walking by an old washing well, with a stairway across the street to the spring below. We had covered another full kilometer from the fountain above at this point. 

Rich and Rob on the Country Road by Spring in San Paio, Galicia, on day four of the English WayRich and Rob on the Country Road by Spring

The next attractive feature you come to, in about another 1/3 kilometer is the Igrexa de San Martiño de Tiobre, shown below. This very charming 12th century church was not open both times I walked by, but just wandering through its walled grounds is satisfying. It is a very peaceful place, high on the hill above Betanzos. 

Igrexa de San Martiño de Tiobre on day four of the English WayIgrexa de San Martiño de Tiobre

After the church you pick up a street called Betanzos Vello, which means "old" Betanzos in Galician. I think this is a lovely name for a road, and you can see we are sailing toward Betanzos on the old road!

Betanzos is within view on day five of the English WayBetanzos in Sight Ahead!

It is a 400 meter walk on the old Betanzos road, then a left and a quick right to begin walking a steep downhill on the Caraña de Arriba, shown below.

Rich and Steve Jaunting Down the Caraña de Arriba on day four of the English WayRich and Steve Jaunting Down the Caraña de Arriba

It is not quite a full kilometer until you come to the church and the impressive high walls of its cemetery at the Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño.

Pass the Cemetery of the Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño in Betanzos on day four of the English WayPass the Cemetery of the Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño in Betanzos

Next is the church itself, farther down the steep hill, shown below. Here the street name takes on the name of the sanctuary and continues down the hill very steeply toward the river!

Steve Passes the Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño on day four of the English WaySteve Passes the Church at the Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño
Rúa Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño in Betanzos, on day four of the English WayRúa Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño, Day Four, Camino Inglés

In 250 meters, the Rúa Santuario de Nosa Señora do Camiño meets the N-651 and the Camino turns to the left. After walking 200 meters more on the N-651 you cross the Río Mandeo to walk into the center of the old medieval town of Betanzos

Cross the Río Mandeo into Medieval Betanzos on day four of the English WayCross the Río Mandeo into Medieval Betanzos

After crossing the river, cross the highway and enter into the old medieval town, through its historic gate, shown below. 

Enter Old Gate of Medieval Betanzos on day four of the English WayEnter Old Gate of Medieval Betanzos

And of course, after the river the Way is uphill, through the gate, to the right then left and up the hill on the Rúa Prateiros, shown below. This is a steep climb of about 150 meters toward the center of town.

The guys were giving me the evil eye as I asked them to keep on climbing until the main plaza, farther on. We were all tired and wanted a break, but I felt it was worth it to continue on for the amenities in the square. 

Just before the supermarket shown in the center of the next photo below, the Camino turns left onto the shrubbery-lined Porta do Vila that takes you back down the hill and to the Central Plaza. 

Walk Uphill on the Rúa Prateiros in Betanzos on day four of the English WayWalk Uphill on the Rúa Prateiros
Left Turn Before Supermercado do Galiz in Betanzos, on day four of the English WayLeft Turn By Supermercado do Galiz

It is a mere 100 meters to the café-lined central square, with the church and convent of Santo Domingo dominating the view. You should be able to find just about anything you need close to this square. It is a wonderful place to sit and relax for awhile! Which is exactly what we did to end this stage of our day. 

Walk on the Porta do Vila to the Central Square of Betanzos on day four of the English WayWalk on the Shrubbery-Lined Porta do Vila to the Central Square of Betanzos

If you are headed to the Albergue de Peregrinos de Betanzos, instead of a left turn towards the central square, turn right and up the hill instead. 

Betanzos is a city of churches and as you head farther up the hill you will soon pass by the Igrexa de Santiago and its tower, shown below. There is an old manor house on the left side of the photo, in the traditional Galician style.

Torre Municipal and Igrexa de Santiago in Betanzos, on day four of the English WayTorre Municipal and Igrexa de Santiago

Continue past the church to Santiago and its plaza, stay right and down the hill on the Rúa Roldán and walk a total of not even 200 meters to come to the albergue that you can see on the corner of the Rúa Roldán and the Rúa Pescadería. You can't miss the sign. Here I am in the photo below, next to the albergue sign in the early morning light of my prior trip, on the Camino Inglés.

Albergue Casa da Pescadería in Betanzos on day four of the English WayAlbergue Casa da Pescadería
Igrexa de Santa María do Azougue in Betanzos on day four of the English WayIgrexa de Santa María do Azougue

If you continue to follow the Rúa Pescadería, you will come to two more historic churches, the 14-15th century church of Igrexa de Santa María do Azougue, shown above, and the 13-14th century Igrexa de San Francisco, shown below. 

Igrexa de San Francisco in Betanzos on day four of the English WayIgrexa de San Francisco

Touring the narrow pedestrian streets and churches of Betanzos is a must. I was able to see several of the churches on a prior trip, but you have to wait until their opening hours, after siesta, about 6:00 p.m. 

On my first trip through Betanzos, I stayed at the albergue. On my second trip, we walked onward. The albergue was opened in 2013, a newly remodeled old building that was clean, adequate and inviting, in a terrific location in the center of the old city. There is a kitchen and 32 places in the dormitory, but no heat. 

Living Area in the Albergue Casa da Pescadería in Betanzos on day four of the English WayLiving Area in the Albergue Casa da Pescadería in Betanzos
Dormitory in the Albergue Casa da Pescadería in Betanzos on day four of the English WayDormitory in the Albergue Casa da Pescadería in Betanzos

If you chose not to cook at the albergue, there are plenty of bars and cafés very near by. If you don't like albergues, or if this one is full, you can browse booking.com for other accommodations by clicking here

Reflections on Day Four on the Camino Inglés

As it turned out, none of the four of us traveling together pushed ourselves too far. In fact we decided to walk onward on the same day to Presedo, to the next available albergue. We all continued to walk well. 

There are plenty of services in both Miño and Betanzos, with not so much in-between. I always advise pilgrims to carry plenty of water and snacks. The countryside is very rural throughout this day. 

Day four on the Camino Inglés is a beautiful walk, strenuous, yet so very rewarding. The hills are steep but doable. Take your time and maybe stretch yourself a bit more. You will make it. 

Salutation

May your own day four on the Camino Inglés involve a bit of risk, so that you too will learn just how far you can go! May your own hill climbing take you to an even higher level than before! Ultreia!



And the Journey Continues:

La Coruña Arm

Ferrol Arm





** Please note that a newer version of my Ebook is very close to publication! All of my Camino Inglés web pages are now updated and the Ebook is not far behind. There have been many changes to the route in the past year. My goal is to have the new Ebook available by the end of August. If you wish to be on a list to get the newest version, contact me and I will put you on a list. If you have already purchased my Ebook or actually purchase it now, I will send you the updated version when it is available, free of charge!**





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