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Day Two on the Camino Inglés
~ Neda to Pontedeume, 14.5 Km (9.01 Miles)

Day two on the Camino Inglés is a nice, but mostly uphill walk through the historic medieval town of Neda and onward over the hills, to cross the Eume River into another medieval town of Pontedeume. While short in length, the climb is significant and not to be underestimated. 

Our foursome continued onward from the albergue in Neda, making it to Pontedeume in fours hours. We chose to continue on and complete the next stage to Miño, shown in day three, for a very strenuous and hilly 25 kilometer day. Read on to make you own choice wisely, according to your own desires. 

"Only when you drink from the river of silence shall you indeed sing. And when you have reached the mountain top, then you shall begin to climb." ~ Khalil Gibran

Maps and Stats of Day Two on the Camino Inglés

Here is our Google map of day two on the Camino Inglés. I have added many places of interest ~ hotels, albergues, cafés and supermarkets, to assist your Camino.

Interactive Map of Day Two on the Camino Inglés, Neda to Pontedeume

Here is the elevation profile for day two. A small hill climb, followed by a long and steep climb for a total elevation gain of 386 meters (1266 feet) is the essence of the day!

Elevation Profile, Day Two on the Camino Inglés, Neda to PontedeumeElevation Profile, Day Two on the Camino Inglés, Neda to Pontedeume

Photo-Rich Travelogue of Day Two on the Camino Inglés, Neda to Pontedeume

It was a crisp and clear morning along the Ferrol estuary as we set out from the Albergue de Peregrinos de Neda. The rain from day one had cleared out and the view over the river was calm and most beautiful. We had sufficient food to prepare ourselves a substantial breakfast before setting off for our day of hill climbing!

The Ferrol Estuary in the Early Morning Light in Neda on day two of the Camino InglésThe Ferrol Estuary in the Early Morning Light

In the past, the Way continued on the promenade along the river, but the route was changed in 2017 to instead take the alley behind the albergue, to the south, and climb up the hill, turning right onto the street called the Aldea Empedron. The street was still wet from the rain as we climbed up towards the main road, the AC-115 through town. 

Uphill from the Albergue on the Aldea Empedron in Neda on day two of the Camino InglésUphill from the Albergue on the Aldea Empedron

It is only a few hundred meters before the Way joins the AC-115. As we walked along the main road, I spied a beautiful home with a blue mural of Fátima. For a moment I thought I was back in Portugal, on one of the Caminos there! The Portuguese influence in Galicia cannot be understated. Fátima is the patron saint of Portugal, if you are unfamiliar with her. You can read about her by clicking here. 

Home with Mural of Fátima, in Neda, on Day Two of the Camino InglésHome with Mural of Fátima on Day Two of the Camino Inglés

Farther along the main road you come to a giant supermarket, the Dia. You can see it the photo, the building with the bright blue roof. If you desire supplies you can stock up here. There are sufficient cafés, however on this leg to Pontedeume, so you don't have to carry food if you don't want. 

Dia Supermarket Ahead in Neda, on the AC-115 on day two of the Camino InglésDia Supermarket Ahead on the AC-115

When possible, the Camino planners keep you off busy roads, and for a few meters, you are diverted onto this side street, paralleling the AC-112.

Rúa Coto Parallels the AC-115 in Neda on day two of the Camino InglésRúa Coto Parallels the AC-115

You must walk on the AC-115 for not quite a full kilometer before coming to the backside of the Iglesia de Santa María de Neda where you turn right towards the church. 

On the church's wall is a plaque, shown below, that shows a dedication for all the pilgrims on the Camino Inglés, on their way to Santiago de Compostela. This plaque was placed here in 2010, to commemorate the Holy Year.

A Holy Year is whenever St. James Day, which is July 25th, falls on a Sunday. The next holy years will be in 2021, 2027 and 2032. The holy years are a very special time with special events and celebrations. The Cathedral in Santiago grants plenary indulgences and a special door is opened, called the Puerta Santa (Holy Door), for pilgrims to enter from the Plaza de la Quintana.

Commemorative Plaque to Pilgrims at the Iglesia de Santa María de Neda on day two of the Camino InglésCommemorative Plaque to Pilgrims at the Iglesia de Santa María de Neda

Follow the yellow arrow around the back of the church to the front side, shown below. 

Iglesia de Santa María de Neda on day two of the Camino InglésIglesia de Santa María de Neda

Look opposite from the front side of the church and you will see a yellow arrow leading you by a playground, shown below. This takes you on a few meters short cut to the main road called the Rúa Real and onward through the old medieval town of Neda.

Shortcut by Playground in Neda on day two of the Camino InglésShortcut by Playground on Day Two of the Camino Inglés

The first place of interest that you come to along the Rúa Real in the medieval town is the former pilgrim hospital, now converted into the Neda town hall. According to the Confraternity of St. James, this was known as the Hospice of the Holy Spirit in medieval times. It has an attractive clock tower that you can see, and if you look closely, there is a fountain below the blue sign, that has potable water if you need a fill up. 

Neda Town Hall, Former Hospice of the Holy Spirit on day two of the Camino InglésNeda Town Hall, Former Hospice of the Holy Spirit
Onward Through the Streets of Neda on day two of the Camino InglésOnward Through the Streets of Neda
Very Old Building on the Rúa Real in Neda on day two of the Camino InglésVery Old Building on the Rúa Real in Neda

We passed by a café close to the end of the Rúa Real, called the O Recuncho, but it was closed up tight this early in the morning. 

It is a short 1/2 kilometer through the medieval town, when just beyond the café you come to this T-intersection, below. The Camino goes left, but if you walk to the right a hundred meters toward the waterfront you will see the 14th century church, the Iglesia de San Nicolás. Unfortunately, I didn't know about it, so we turned and walked onward. Thus ends the jaunt back in time. 

Left Turn Here Onto the Rua Xeneral Morgado on day two of the Camino InglésLeft Turn Here Onto the Rua Xeneral Morgado

Then its straight onward for approximately another 600 meters, before coming once again to the AC-115, and turning right onto it. We are joking around at the bus stop where you turn right, pretending we were heading back to Ferrol on the bus!

Right Turn at the Bus Stop on the AC-115 in Neda on day two of the Camino InglésElle and Rich at the Right Turn at the Bus Stop on the AC-115

The Way does not remain on the AC-115, but immediately takes a side road to the left. In 100 meters or so it bears to the right, to begin the first climb of the day. First it is up to the bridge that crosses over the E-1, as it comes from the other side of the estuary. You can see the viaduct across the estuary in the photo below. We passed by this bridge on the other side, and you can see from our map how we have been circumnavigating the very long estuary. 

Cross the E-1 on Bridge on day two of the Camino InglésCross the E-1 on Bridge

After the bridge over the E-1, the climb steepens significantly. Below is Rich and Rob negotiating the steep pavement. 

Begin Steep Climb on the Calle Fabrica Labora on day two of the Camino InglésBegin Steep Climb on the Calle Fabrica Labora

I ran ahead to photograph the climbing pilgrimage travelers, Rob, Rich and Steve and get a shot of the view that no one bothered to look behind them to see!

Nearing the Top in Silva on day two of the Camino InglésNearing the Top in Silva

It is a mere 1/2 kilometer climb to the top, so take heart! The top is at this next T-intersection, where the Way goes to the right, onto the Aldea Silva, shown below. 

Welcome to Silva Sign at the Top on day two of the Camino InglésWelcome to Silva Sign at the Top

It feels quite flat to walk along the Aldea Silva, a sort of high shelf road, where the lofty views of the Ferrol estuary kept my eyes full of wonder for a long while!

Lofty View of Ferrol Estuary on day two of the Camino InglésLofty View of Ferrol Estuary on Day Two of the Camino Inglés

In 1/2 kilometer, follow the kilometer marker to the left and onto the Aldea Conces, below. The nice views continue for awhile longer. 

Turn Left Here Onto Aldea Conces on day two of the Camino InglésTurn Left Here Onto Aldea Conces

Spring was in full bloom on day two of the Camino Inglés and it was never evidenced as much than with this gorgeous Camellia tree. We were to see many more of them along the English Way. 

Red Camellia Bush on day two of the Camino InglésRed Camellia Bush
Continuing on the Aldea Conces on day two of the Camino InglésContinuing on the Aldea Conces

In 300 meters from the start of the Aldea Conces, we came to the road sign stating that we were entering the municipality of Fene

We walked up the hill towards the sign and onto what is now known as the Rúa Fonte do Campo. Still climbing, we walked past the 94.5 kilometer marker, with a view of the estuary behind it. 

94.5 Kilometer Marker in Fene on day two of the Camino Inglés94.5 Kilometer Marker in Fene

There is another 700 meters or so of nice flat walking along the top with continued open views on the Rúa Fonte do Campo.

Then it is a left turn on a bit of an uphill and onto the Camiño Casanova, where we came to the sign for first town of Casanova, shown in the photo below.

Left Turn Here Towards Casanova on day two of the Camino InglésLeft Turn Here Towards Casanova

Then it is a mere 400 meters down the Camiño Casanova as you are directed down a hill and into the center of town of Fene. You come to the intersection for the main street, the N-651, shown below. Across the street, is the Café Lembranza. Since we were only about 5.0 kilometers into day two on the English Way, we continued onward. On my first trip through here, my Camino partner and I stopped and had a very nice coffee break here. 

Café Lembranza in Fene on day two of the Camino InglésCafé Lembranza in Fene

The Camino crosses the N-651 and heads due south, jogging through town a bit, then straight south on the Rúa Alcalde Gerardo Díaz as it begins a gradual climb. After less than a kilometer, the climb begins to steepen as you walk through the village of Chamosa. Here the Way joins the Rúa Travesa.

Initial Gradual Climb Out of Fene on day two of the Camino InglésInitial Gradual Climb Out of Fene

As you walk farther south, the Way becomes more rural. 

Southward on the Rural Rúa Travesa on day two of the Camino InglésSouthward on the Rural Rúa Travesa

As you leave the village of Chamosa, the rural road becomes much more steep. After a tad more than 1/2 kilometer you leave the road and turn right on the path shown below. 

Real Climb Begins After Leaving Chamosa on day two of the Camino InglésReal Climb Begins After Leaving Chamosa
The Climb Ahead on day two of the Camino InglésThe Climb Ahead
Climbing More Steeply on the Path on day two of the Camino InglésRich and Rob Climbing More Steeply on the Path
92 Kilometer Waymark Entering the Forest on day two of the Camino Inglés92 Kilometer Waymark Entering the Forest
Steve Pushes On Toward the Top on day two of the Camino InglésSteve Pushes On Toward the Top on Day Two of the Camino Inglés

I was kind of naughty running ahead to take a photo of the gentlemen exerting up the final push. However, it is my job to document the journey, right? (Grin ~ Wink ~ Grin)

The Final Ultra-Steep Section on day two of the Camino InglésThe Final Push on the Ultra-Steep Section

It is another 1/2 kilometer on the dirt path until the top, for a total of about 2.0 kilometers on the climb thus far. Not that bad, eh? 

You walk on this path next to the E-1 for about 1/3 kilometer. It was rather muddy when we passed through, but improved farther along as you can see in the next photos below.

The Top of the Arduous Climb by the E-1  on day two of the Camino InglésThe Top of the Arduous Climb by the E-1
Path Follows the E-1 for 1/3 Kilometer on day two of the English WayPath Follows the E-1 for 1/3 Kilometer

The path walks under the E-1, pops out on the other side, shown in this photo below. I would have preferred not to walk near a very busy highway, but I suppose if we had to cross over it, this wasn't a bad way to do it. 

Path on the Other Side of the E-1 on day two of the English WayPath on the Other Side of the E-1

In a very short way from the other side, we turned right onto a lane that runs parallel and below the N-651. Walking onward about 300 meters, we came to this intersection, below, and crossed over the road, the DP-3505 to continue to follow the lane. We are still climbing a bit, but since the E-1 crossing it feels much more gradual.

Cross the DP-3505, Continue Straight On on day two of the Camino InglésCross the DP-3505, Continue Straight On

After 200 meters more, this sign directed us to turn right and follow the lane shown in the photo below. This is another "provisional detour." When I look at the map above, most likely the Camino will continue on straight here in the near future as improvements are made on this section. 

Right Turn Onto Desvío Provisional on day two of the English WayRight Turn Onto Desvío Provisional

Several hundred meters uphill on this muddy lane and we arrived at the intersection below, in a major industrial area in Vilar do Colo. We turned left here.  

Turn Left Into Industrial Area on day two of the English WayTurn Left Into Industrial Area on Day Two of the English Way

And when we walked by this place in a few more meters, the Café Vilar do Colo, we were more than happy to seize the opportunity to take a break and have lunch, about 10 kilometers into our day since Neda. This place is a major truck stop and they also have a nice convenience store to get snacks for your pack if needed. We took the opportunity to stock up our packs with nuts and energy bars. 

Café Vilar do Colo on day two of the English WayCafé Vilar do Colo

The restaurant is on the corner of a large intersection, so after our lunch break, all we had to do was find the yellow detour signs again and take a left at this roundabout, onto the VG-1.2.

Left at Roundabout in Vilar do Colo on day two of the English WayLeft at Roundabout in Vilar do Colo

In several hundred meters more, the Camino goes right and onto the N-651 once again. You may also be able to see in the photo below, the next blue Camino sign directing the next move to the left. 

on day two of the English WayBriefly Join the N-651

A left turn off the N-651 puts you on this nice side lane for about 400 meters.

Side Lane Avoids the Highway on day two of the English WaySide Lane Avoids the Highway

But alas, we rejoin the N-651 to walk into the town of Pereiro.

Rejoin the N-651 in Pereiro on day two of the English WayRejoin the N-651 in Pereiro

The Camino Inglés on day two only stays on the N-651 for about another 400 kilometers, before turning right onto another path, also shown below. 

Along the N-651 in Pereiro on day two of the English WayAlong the N-651 in Pereiro
Right Turn Onto Path in Pereiro on day two of the English WayRight Turn Onto Path in Pereiro

The path is a short-lived 1/3 kilometer, where at its end you pick up the Camino Feal to the left. That is the E-1 ahead, that you walk under on this street. As you walk under the E-1, a sign identifies that you have just walked into the next town of O Feal. 

Walking Toward the E-1 and O Feal on day two of the English WayWalking Toward the E-1 and O Feal

You meander around the countryside on the Camino Feal for the next 1.5 kilometers until you meet up again with the N-651. 

Along the Camino Feal on day two of the English WayAlong the Camino Feal
Continue Along the Camino Feal on Day Two of the English WayContinue Along the Camino Feal on Day Two of the English Way

Just after crossing the N-651, and continuing straight on, you see this kilometer marker and the road becomes the Camiño do Cadivas. 

80.952 Kilometer Marker on the Camiño do Cadivas on day two of the English Way80.952 Kilometer Marker on the Camiño do Cadivas
Along the Camiño do Cadivas on day two of the English WayAlong the Camiño do Cadivas
Continue on the Camiño do Cadivas on day two of the English WayContinue on the Camiño do Cadivas

The 2/3 kilometer walk along the Camiño do Cadivas, though paved, is pleasant and quiet and very rural for being so close to Pontedeume

Then you come to a wider street, shown below, and cross over it, to stay right and walk onto the lane instead. You are now entering the next town of Cabañas on day two of the English Way. Almost there!

Stay Right Onto Lane, Entering Cabañas on day two of the English WayStay Right Onto Lane, Entering Cabañas

Then the nice descent toward the Eume River becomes steeper. Notice the grey granary, called an "horreo" in the next photo.

Descending Toward the River Eume on day two of the English WayDescending Toward the River Eume
Rob and Rich Chatting on the DescentRob and Rich Chatting on the Descent
Steep Descent Toward Pontedeume on the Camino NogueiraSteep Descent Toward Pontedeume on the Camino Nogueira

In another 1/2 kilometer, the Camino comes to the N-651 and turns left here. 

Left Turn on the N-651 in Cabañas on day two of the English WayLeft Turn on the N-651 in Cabañas
Continue on the N-651 in Cabañas on day two of the English WayContinue on the N-651 in Cabañas

In 2/3 kilometer on the N-651, come to the roundabout by the Parque de Cabañas, shown below and walk straight on towards the bridge. 

Straight On Through the Roundabout by the Parque de Cabañas on day two of the English WayStraight On Through the Roundabout by the Parque de Cabañas

The only thing that separates you and Pontedeume at this point is the bridge across the river. It is a long 1/2 kilometer walk across the bridge. The first time I walked it, it was to end the long first day's stage from Ferrol. I thought the bridge went on forever! 

The Albergue de Peregrinos de Pontedeume is in the long, orange-roofed building that you can see on the right side of the photo, below, directly above the boat. When you cross the bridge and reach the roundabout, take the first right, walk along the waterfront and arrive at the albergue in 200 meters. It is the 4th door down of the long, stone building. 

Bridge Across the Río Eume into Pontedeume on day two of the English WayBridge Across the Río Eume into Pontedeume

This second time I walked the bridge it went much faster. I was only 14 kilometers into my day this time. What a difference it made on how I felt. 

Entering Pontedeume on day two of the English WayEntering Pontedeume

My Camino pals and I did not end our day here in Pontedeume, but walked on to Miño. See day three for this day's adventure.

On my first Camino I did stay here, in the Hostal Allegue, a comfortable family-run place, mere steps from the Camino. We had checked out the albergue and didn't like the fact that someone was spraying down the beds with bug spray when we arrived! It was my first Camino ever and this scared me!

There was also no hospitalero to check in with until eight o'clock. I know now that this is not a problem, that you can still get settled in and then get checked in later with the hospitalero when it is convenient for him/her. Live and learn I guess. 

There are several more accommodations available if you don't like albergues. Check my Google map above for more information. Booking.com has none listed for this town. 

Reflections on Day Two on the Camino Inglés

The route has changed significantly from the time I had first walked it. I was happy to see some familiar sights, yet not very sure that I enjoyed some of the other chosen routing. The industrial section on the provisional way, I hope will be more pleasant in the future. 

Our friend with Parkinson's was walking strong, despite the strenuous hills so we decided to walk the 10 more kilometers to Miño in the afternoon. He was an inspiration to us! You can see Rich chatting away with him in a lot of the photos, keeping his mind occupied. I am not sure if that was the right thing to do or not, but it appeared to work. 

We stopped in Pontedeume for a while to rest and eat ice cream. We also wandered off the Camino to see the 16th century Igrexa Parroquial de Santiago, the St. James church. It is a lovely place, but it was closed around noon when we arrived. I have yet to get inside it! See our day three for photos of it.

While we did lots of hills on day two of our Camino Inglés, the one ahead out of Pontedeume, from sea level, would be the biggest challenge going forward. The quote above, from Khalil Gibran can be taken quite literally, for day two and most days ahead. It seemed like when you reached the top of the hill, there was always another one to replace it! Thus is the way of the English Way! Thus is life!

Salutation

May your own day two on your Camino Inglés be filled with the sweet and challenging song of many hills. May you conquer those hills ~ ready, willing and able to do it again and again! Ultreia!







** The new and improved version of our guide book, as of 8/2018, is now available to purchase. This digital eBook, in PDF format, now has all the the updates in the route changes that happened in 2017 and 2018! Click here for more information.





And the Journey Continues:

La Coruña Arm

Ferrol Arm




› Day Two on the Camino Inglés






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