Day Two on the Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm ~ Sergude to Hospital de Bruma, 13 Km (8.07 Miles)

Our day two on the Camino Inglés, of the La Coruña arm was another steep uphill climb, albeit short and sweet. There were only a few pilgrims on the road on this brisk, cool April morning. Because we covered the distance in only a few hours, it was a perfect situation to take our time, relish the experience and enjoy the walk. 

On Hiking: ~ "I don't like either the word or the thing. People ought to saunter in the mountains - not hike! Do you know the origin of that word 'saunter?' It's a beautiful word. Away back in the Middle Ages people used to go on pilgrimages to the Holy Land, and when people in the villages through which they passed asked where they were going, they would reply, 'A la sainte terre,' 'To the Holy Land.' And so they became known as sainte-terre-ers or saunterers. Now these mountains are our Holy Land, and we ought to saunter through them reverently, not 'hike' through them." ~ John Muir 

Maps and Stats of Day Two, Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm

Here is our map of this day, uploaded to Google maps from our GPS tracks. It does not include the final two kilometers that we walked from the albergue in Bruma to Mesón do Vento to catch the bus to A Coruña and ultimately to Ferrol to start the Ferrol arm of the Camino Inglés the next day. 

I saw no grocery stores along the route, so you may need to rely on cafés and restaurants unless you have been carrying plenty of food since A Coruña. This will not be an issue as there are plenty along the way. There is a small market at the gas station in Mesón do Vento, but it is a long way from the albergue. 

I have also placed accommodations and location of cafés along the route. 

Interactive Google Map of Day Two, Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm

Despite the mere 13 kilometers for day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino Inglés you will notice the steep climb of approximately 400 meters to conclude the stage. This feels extremely strenuous, so if you are combining day one and day two, from Coruña take note!

Elevation Profile, Day Two Camino Inglés, La Coruña ArmElevation Profile, Day Two Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm

Photo-Rich Travelogue of Day Two, Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm

We started out our morning with no food in our packs except for some candy bars for breakfast, which we did not eat. Our intention was to stop at the Café Bar Casa Adolfo, just 400 meters down the road. The proprietress stated the evening before that she would open at 0800. 

Here is a photo of walking down the CP-2103 from the Albergue de Sergude, in the beautiful morning light, just before 0800.

Walking Down the CP-2103 From the Albergue de Sergude on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésWalking Down the CP-2103 From the Albergue de Sergude

We walked past an information board in a few meters and came to the Café Bar Casa Adolfo, shown below. The place was closed up tight as a drum. We waited outside until 0810, then were too cold to wait any longer and headed onward. 

Rich at the Café Bar Casa Adolfo on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésRich at the Café Bar Casa Adolfo

You make a right turn here onto a side road after 600 meters from the albergue. You may still see a faint yellow arrow on the wall directing you to go straight. Ignore the yellow arrow, and follow the pillar instead, to the right.

Right Turn Onto Side Road in 600 Meters on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésRight Turn Onto Side Road in 600 Meters

In only 50 meters turn left onto a farmer's lane, below.

Immediate Left Turn Onto Farmer's Lane on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésImmediate Left Turn Onto Farmer's Lane

The lane becomes an improved path, and descends toward the Ría da Brexa. It was quite cool here in this wooded area on the morning of day two, of the Coruña arm of the Camino Inglés. So much so that I had to wear my fleece to stay warm! It was April. The north coast of Spain, in Galicia can be quite chilly this time of year as it was today! 

Descend on Improved Path to the Ría da Brexa on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésDescend on Improved Path to the Ría da Brexa

The developed path continues after the river and turns right at the 52.0 kilometer marker, below. As you would expect on the Camino Inglés, a descent is always followed by a climb, this time quite steeply on the other side.

52.0 Kilometer Marker on the Path on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino Inglés52.0 Kilometer Marker on the Path

The path then joins another forest lane and continues to climb, where the morning light danced through the trees. It was a gorgeous sight. I breathed it in deeply. I always love the mornings so much. I tried to saunter to take it all in, but I also needed to stay warm!

Morning Light Dancing Through the Trees on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésMorning Light Dancing Through the Trees

Once again the Camino joins the pavement here at the 51. 5 kilometer marker, after walking not quite a kilometer through the woods.

Join Pavement at the 51.5 Kilometer Marker on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésJoin Pavement at the 51.5 Kilometer Marker

Walk straight on through the first intersection in a few meters, then for another 1/2 kilometer on the Bailía Street and to another intersection and information board. According to the information board this area was known for its healing waters in the past and was a pilgrimage destination in its own right. 

on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésAlong the Bailía Street on Day Two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino Inglés

Shortly onward the street turns to another lane. 

Street Becomes a Lane on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésStreet Becomes a Lane

After about 800 meters, the lane becomes pavement ahead, shown here...

In 800 meters, the Lane Becomes Pavement Again on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésIn 800 meters, the Lane Becomes Pavement Again

...and comes to this T-intersection after about 400 meters more and turns right, below to enter Sarandóns.

Turn Right to Enter Sarandóns on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésTurn Right to Enter Sarandóns

After 50 meters, the Camino joins the main street through town at this wayside chapel, the Capilla de San Juan. There is also another nice information board by the chapel.

Capilla de San Juan in Sarandóns on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésCapilla de San Juan in Sarandóns

Also at the junction with the main street is the Café Bar Central in Sarandóns. The Café Bar O Central is reached after 3.2 kilometers into the day. It was totally closed at 08:45. May 1st was the Labor Day holiday, so we were expecting this. 

Café Bar O Central on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésCafé Bar O Central

We walked 300 meters through town, turned right here at sign for the Casa Veiga. We decided to see if the restaurant was open and turned left toward it instead. 

Turn Right Off Main Street Here on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésTurn Right Off Main Street Here

After walking 200 meters off-route we saw the hill ahead, stopped and said to ourselves, "If the past three cafés we walked by were closed on the holiday, what are the odds that this one will be open? Slim to none." So we turned around and went back to the Camino.

Then you walk several hundred meters more and bear right on this very rural country road on day two of the Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm.

Walking Along Country Road on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésWalking Along Country Road

You keep walking straight south on country paved roads, following the waymarks, for almost 3.0 full kilometers as the next photos show. 

Country manors or "pazos" dot the countryside, as another information board at the AC-222 states, along with information about the history of these manors.

Steady Climbing Towards the Steady Climbing Towards the "Peito" or Top
Bear Right Ahead and Keep on Climbing on day two of the Camino Inglés, Coruña Arm!Bear Right Ahead and Keep on Climbing!
Short, Flat Area With Sweeping Vistas on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésShort, Flat Area With Sweeping Vistas
Turn Left at Green Information Board Ahead on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésTurn Left at Green Information Board Ahead

We did manage to pause quite a bit, on this day's saunter, and take it slower, as you can see by the next photos. 

Elle on Road to Cultivated Wooded Area on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésElle on Road to Cultivated Wooded Area
Continued Open Views Everywhere on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésContinued Open Views Everywhere
Rich on Flat Area But Not the Top on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésRich on Flat Area But Not the Top

We continued climbing steeply on forestry roads as they turned to gravel. We still hadn't eaten anything. I could have eaten a Payday bar from my pack, but I didn't. We had had a huge meal the night before, so I didn't feel too bad. I was sucking on cough drops to give me a bit of sugar for the hills, and was pounding down the water, hoping that at least my belly was going down!

The Way Turns to Gravel as the Climb Steepens on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésThe Way Turns to Gravel as the Climb Steepens
Still Climbing on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésStill Climbing!

Then we see a radio tower ahead. As is often the case, the radio towers are at the top. Our spirits livened. Surely this must be the top? You can faintly pick out the radio tower ahead, on the road in the photo below. 

Radio Tower Ahead! This Must Be the Top on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésRadio Tower Ahead! This Must Be the Top!

The forest gave way to views opening up in a large agricultural area. 

Large Agricultural Area on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésLarge Agricultural Area

At the very top, the "Peito" as it is called were open, plowed fields ready to plant. The top, is indeed by the radio tower, shown in the photo below.

Open, Plowed Fields at the Peito on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésOpen, Plowed Fields at the Peito

Here is a look back at A Coruña from the top. You can see the high-rise buildings in the distance. 

Looking Back to A Coruña on Day Two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésLooking Back to A Coruña on Day Two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino Inglés

Here is Rich at the top. When the view opens from out of the trees, you can also see the power plant off in the distance that is to your right shoulder. It was 8.5 kilometers to the top of the Peito from the start of day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino Inglés. There are short, and very steep spots. It is all very doable if you take your time. 

There are lots of dairy farms at the top, as well, seen through the power lines.

The elevation tops 504 meters exactly at the very top. We started the day at about 50 meters in elevation. It was a good 450 meter climb, another 1500 feet or so.

Rich at the Top, the Rich at the Top, the "Peito"

After reaching the top, the path comes to this juncture, pictured below. You don't join the AC-542 but cross over to the flat path on the other side. There is no climb remaining. The off-pavement length of the walk was about a total of 2.0 kilometers.

Cross the AC-542 Here on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésCross the AC-542 Here

You see the sign for As Travesas on the road, but turn left at here instead. 

Welcome to As Travesas Sign on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésWelcome to As Travesas Sign

After crossing the street, then take an almost immediate right, shown below...

Cross Highway to Path on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésCross Highway to Path

...to this path, through the forest, paralleling the AC-542 to the east. 

Charming Path Through the Forest on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésCharming Path Through the Forest

Eventually you can see the AC-542 off to the right. 

The AC-542 Runs Parallel on the Right on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésThe AC-542 Runs Parallel on the Right

After a bit more than one kilometer, the side road joins the AC-542 to walk into As Travesas, on day two, Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm.

Join the AC-542 Towards As Travesas on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésJoin the AC-542 Towards As Travesas

In 400 meters on the A-542 come to the Café Bar Casa Avelina. What a welcome sight for we hungry pilgrims!

Café Bar Casa Avelina on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésCafé Bar Casa Avelina Ahead
The Hub of Town Activity at the Café Bar Casa Avelina on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésThe Hub of Town Activity at the Café Bar Casa Avelina

Across the street from the Café Bar Casa Avelina is the chapel, the Capela de San Roque supported entirely by pilgrims. We did not see inside it on day two because we were trying to catch the 12:40 bus in Mesón do Vento to A Coruña and couldn't delay at the bar for very long.

I also knew we would be passing through here again in a few more days from the Ferrol Arm, on day six, so we could see it then. The bar will ask you for a donation for the chapel, that you place in a special envelope with your name and country of origin. It is fun to do this, and giving your spare change is sufficient. If you have time to tour it, just ask at the bar and they will give you a key to have a look at this quaintest of chapels. It is worth your spare change!

To see the legend of San Roque, the patron saint of dogs, click here

Capela de San Roque on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayCross and Capela de San Roque

After filling our bellies with delicious bocadillos (sandwiches) we carried on toward Hospital Bruma. Just after the bar on the AC-542 is another blue information board.

Information Board in As Travesas on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the Camino InglésInformation Board in As Travesas

It is another kilometer's walk along the AC-542, leaving As Travesas, passing the landmark electric substation of Meson do Vento, another 42.2 kilometer marker, past the Repsol gas station, and turning left into the forest after a total of 1.6 kilometers total on  the AC-542.

Along the AC-542 After As Travesas on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayAlong the AC-542 After As Travesas on Day Two, La Coruña Arm of the Camino Inglés
Electric Substation of Meson do Vento on the AC-542 on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayElectric Substation of Meson do Vento on the AC-542
Past the Repsol Station on the AC-542 on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayPast the Repsol Station on the AC-542
Left Turn Ahead Off the AC-542 on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayLeft Turn Ahead Off the AC-542

Just beyond the electrical substation is a bronze age site, called the Castro das Travesas or the Castro Hill Fort. We did not see this, but it may be worth a side trip if you are a history buff. Not much is left of the castro but the dirt mounds. Turn right immediately after the electric switching area to see the historical marker and mounds. 

Turn into the forest on this country lane, below, toward Bruma. It is possible that if your destination is a hotel in Mesón do Vento, that you could walk straight on the AC-542 to reach the town. It will be a shortcut, rather than following the Camino to Hospital de Bruma

Left Turn Onto This Country Lane on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayLeft Turn Onto This Country Lane
Continuing On Country Lane Towards Hospital de Bruma on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayContinuing On Country Lane Towards Hospital de Bruma

After not quite one kilometer on this lane, it ends on the pavement, by the kilometer marker in Hospital de Bruma, shown below. Turn right here.

Right Turn at End of Lane on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayRight Turn at End of Lane

In a few meters turn left to walk through Hospital and by this lovely historic horreo.

Horreo and Entering Hospital de Bruma on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayHorreo and Entering Hospital de Bruma

In 1/2 kilometer more, you have arrived at the Albergue de Hospital de Bruma. This lovely old stone building can be cold in the off seasons, as I found out in my first stay here in September of 2014. But is is still a lovely and adequate place. 

Albergue de Hospital de Bruma on day two of the La Coruña Arm of the English WayAlbergue de Hospital de Bruma

We did  not stay here this time, but we walked onward, 2.0 kilometers to the town of Mesón do Vento to join the the main street, the AC-542. Our desire was to catch the 12:40 Monbus from Mesón do Vento to A Coruña. Click on the link to see the schedule. The bus frequency is reduced on Sundays and holidays, and since our day two was the Labor Day Holiday, May 1st, we needed to make this bus or have to wait hours longer for the next one. 

Our ultimate goal was to get to Ferrol, and the only way to get there by bus is through A Coruña. The Monbus website is also provided in English, so be sure to change the language in the top right hand corner if you plan to check the schedule!

It is 2.3 kilometers from the albergue in Hospital de Bruma to the bus stop, just beyond the Restaurante la Ruta. Make sure you wait on the same side as the restaurant! (Or, it is 2.4 kilometers from the turn off the AC-542 by the Repsol station as described above to the bus stop.)

Once in A Coruña the bus line to take to Ferrol is Arriva. These buses run almost every 1/2 hour in peak times, so you are sure to get a convenient connection.

Alternatively, if you prefer the train, Renfe is the line from A Coruña to Ferrol. However, I find that changing stations is less convenient, even though it is only across several highways from the bus station in A Coruña. It is tricky to walk from one to another.

See day one on the Coruña arm to locate the bus and rail stations in A Coruña.

Reflections on Day Two, Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm

This day was without excitement, nor great bonds forming with other pilgrims, nor great insights for me. It was, however a lovely walk through the Galician countryside that I did not rush or take for granted. It was more of an interim day for me, and I felt that indeed, it was a "sainte terre," a holy land in its own right. It was a place to be revered and cherished. 

Salutation

May you have great reverence for the land and its offerings on your own day two of the Coruña Arm of the Camino Inglés. May you have sufficient time to saunter through the beautiful Galician countryside! Ultreia!


And the Journey Continues:

La Coruña Arm

Ferrol Arm





** Please note that a newer version of my Ebook is very close to publication! All of my Camino Inglés web pages are now updated and the Ebook is not far behind. There have been many changes to the route in the past year. My goal is to have the new Ebook available by the end of August. If you wish to be on a list to get the newest version, contact me and I will put you on a list. If you have already purchased my Ebook or actually purchase it now, I will send you the updated version when it is available, free of charge!**





› Day Two on the Camino Inglés, La Coruña Arm








New! Comments

Have you had a similar experience, or have something you'd like to share? We would love to hear from you! Please leave us a comment in the box below.



Please Consider Showing Your Support

Many readers contact me, Elle, to thank me for all the time and care that I have spent creating this informative website. If you have been truly blessed by my efforts and wish to contribute, I am very grateful. Thank-you! (Please note that by clicking the Donate button, you will be directed to the Body Window, LLC, of which The Pilrgrimage Traveler is a subsidary).





Search This Website:





Need suggestions on what to pack for your next pilgrimaage? Click Here or on the photo below!



Black Diamond Carbon Z-Poles

These poles get a 5-star rating on Amazon!

Our recommendation for the best trekking pole. Carbon fiber construction ( not aluminum ) makes them ultra lightweight. H idea your poles in your pack from potential thieves , before you get to your albergue! ( See more of our gear recommendations! )



Gregory BackPack - My Favorite Brand

An ultralight backpack should serve you well for years, like my Gregory has - six Caminos in all! My 28L Women's pack gets a 5-star on Amazon (Ones for Guys too)!



Microfiber Towel Set

Do not forget your quick-dry microfiber towel! This one gets a 5-star rating on Amazon



My absolute favorite book on how to be a pilgrim:





Booking.com