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Day Six on the Camino Inglés
Presedo to Hospital de Bruma, 12.97 Km (8.06 Miles)

Our day six on the Camino Inglés was short, yet difficult, as the relentless hill-climbing continued. At least the Way here was rural, mostly shaded, and on quiet forest lanes for most of the day. This day was a challenge, in more ways than one as we sought to fit into cultural norms that were different than ours. Tired and hungry pilgrims are discouraged pilgrims!

Day six is quite rural, offering few services for the pilgrimage traveler. The Camino here walks through forest after forest on dirt roads, that intersect only a few small towns. Be sure your pack is full of plenty of food and water for your day, especially if you are starting from Betanzos. Stock up at a city before Presedo as there is nothing there!

“Somewhere between the bottom of the climb and the summit is the answer to the mystery why we climb.”  ~ Greg Child

Maps and Stats of Day Six on the Camino Inglés

Here is our Google map, uploaded from our GPS tracks, with available services placed on it to assist your planning for the day.

Interactive Google Map of Day Six on the Camino Inglés

It is a steady climb starting 2.5 kilometers after Presedo for over 5.0 kilometers. The elevation gain is over 400 meters (1400 feet). You will feel this climb! Settle into the day, breathe and reflect on why you are doing this Camino! Is it such a mystery? 

Elevation Profile, Day Six on the Camino InglésElevation Profile, Day Six on the Camino Inglés

I did include the 1.8 kilometer walk to the town of Ó Mesón do Vento in the day's distance total, so if you are stopping at the albergue in Bruma, the total distance for day six is only 11.17 kilometers.

Photo-Rich Travelogue of Day Six on the Camino Inglés

We all arose in good spirits and ready for the day. We had come to Presedo prepared for the day, having carried sufficient food and instant coffee in our packs for breakfast. It was to be enough to get us the 9.5 kilometers to the Bar Avelina in As Travesas. Rich and I knew the bar, as it is where the Coruña Arm of the English Way, on day two joins the Ferrol Arm. It was worth going the distance to relax and eat there. 

After leaving the albergue we walked back up the hill, across the DP-0105 to rejoin the Camino Inglés where we left it the day before. Presedo is not much of a town, and the back lane behind it looks like there is not even a town!

Leaving Presedo on Back Lane on day six of the Camino InglésLeaving Presedo on Back Lane

Indeed, the way becomes a dirt lane within a few meters. 

Back Lane in Presedo Turns to Dirt on day six of the Camino InglésBack Lane in Presedo Turns to Dirt

In about only 600 meters on day six, the Camino Inglés walks by the Mesón Museo, the incredible place where we ate dinner on day fiveThey were closed as we walked by. I doubt it opens much before 9:00 in the morning.

Walk by the Mesón Museo in Presedo,  on day six of the Camino InglésWalk by the Mesón Museo

In another 600 meters, we turned right by the 52 kilometer marker, shown below. We were more than halfway to Santiago and our final two days were to be long ones. 

Right Turn by the 52 Kilometer Marker on day six of the Camino InglésRight Turn by the 52 Kilometer Marker

The English Way turns to a sort of semi-pavement here, half dirt, half pavement. It essentially parallels the main road, the DP-0105 but takes the extreme rural route to the east. If you are seeking a quiet Camino, albeit mostly paved, this is your Camino!

Country Lane Through Place Called Barrio on day six of the Camino InglésCountry Lane Through Place Called Barrio

In 1/4 kilometer from the 52k marker, turn left, then an almost immediate right turn at the red brick building shown below. 

Right Turn at Red Brick Building on day six of the Camino InglésRight Turn Onto Forest Lane at Red Brick Building
Picturesque Backdrop for 51.8 Kilometer Waymark on day six of the Camino InglésPicturesque Backdrop for 51.8 Kilometer Waymark

The lane ahead is a casual two-track forest lane, both quaint and quiet for a brief 200 meters. 

Quaint and Quiet Two-Track Forest Lane on day six of the Camino InglésQuaint and Quiet Two-Track Forest Lane

We came to a T-intersection and turned left onto this windy paved road through more forest. The deep shadows of the early morning light lifted my spirits, as the freshness of a new day always does. 

The Paved Camino Inglés Through Forest on Day SixThe Paved Camino Inglés Through Forest on Day Six

After 400 meters of walking, you arrive at the hamlet of Leiro, in the parish of Abegondo. You will first come to a picnic area where you will see another old information board, shown below. This is a lovely, shady place to stop for a picnic lunch, with a potable water fountain to fill your reserves if needed. 

Beware the information on these old boards! They are no longer current, so unless you are intending to walk the old route, read the historical information and know that the maps no longer depict the current route. 

The Old English Way Information Board in Leiro ~ Maps No Longer Current! on day six of the Camino InglésThe Old English Way Information Board in Leiro ~ Maps No Longer Current!

A few meters onward from the picnic area is the lovely church, the 18th century Iglesia de Santa Eulalia de Leiro. 

Iglesia de Santa Eulalia de Leiro on day six of the Camino InglésIglesia de Santa Eulalia de Leiro

It is after the church in Leiro that the route changes are the most dramatic. While the old route walks straight on after the church, the current route takes an immediate right for 200 meters to join the DP-0105. It is at this intersection, shown below that the new route turns to the left to join the DP-0105.

Left Turn Here to Join the DP-0105 on Day Six of the Camino InglésLeft Turn Here to Join the DP-0105 on Day Six of the Camino Inglés

Walk on the DP-0105 for 300 meters, turning right onto a long, gravel forest road. This forest road lasts for over 2.5 kilometers. It is when you reach this gravel road just after Leiro that the long, over five kilometer climb begins! 

Breathe and settle in because this is stretch will require a sustained effort. Don't push it or force yourself to walk harder, because you will only get worn out sooner! Thus far, our group was going well, walking steadily onward and upward. 

The Long Climb Begins on Gravel Road After Leiro on day six of the Camino InglésThe Long Climb Begins on Gravel Road After Leiro

The new route takes a direct approach on this long, wide gravel road, completely without traffic. In my opinion, this route is not as beautiful nor as quaint as the old route's meanderings through the villages and farms. However, it is most certainly a safer one!

Long and Direct Current Route on the Gravel Road on day six of the Camino InglésLong and Direct Current Route on the Gravel Road

If you are interested in walking the old route by the Casa Julia, and through the farms and are a strong walker, contact me and I will send you the GPS tracks of the old route. The new route, being more direct is a full 2.0 kilometers shorter than the old. 

Steve Adjusts Rob's Pack on the Gravel Road on day six of the Camino InglésSteve Adjusts Rob's Pack on the Gravel Road

After walking the full 2.5 kilometers on the gravel forest road, the road becomes paved just before the newly-built park and reservoir called the Encoro de Beche. You can see the small damned reservoir on your left as you walk by. There are nice picnic tables to rest and have a picnic if you desire.

Park and Reservoir at the Encoro de Beche on day six of the Camino InglésPark and Reservoir at the Encoro de Beche
Picnic Tables at the Encoro de Beche on day six of the Camino InglésPicnic Tables at the Encoro de Beche

After walking by the park, you come to a T-intersection and take a left onto another quiet paved road, shown below. We were lucky to see a deer standing in the road as we approached! The English Way on day six also flattens out through this stretch, so you will have a nice reprieve for your lungs. 

Deer Spotted on the Pavement on day six of the Camino InglésDeer Spotted on the Pavement

This now paved road takes you to and walks you under the E-1.

Walk Under the E-1 on day six of the Camino InglésWalk Under the E-1 on Day Six of the Camino Inglés

We passed by the concrete marker here, staying right, just before the next village of Vao, ahead.

Rob En Route Towards Vao on day six of the Camino InglésRob En Route Towards Vao

After 3/4 kilometer of pavement walking and after coming into the hamlet of Vao, the Camino once again takes a turn uphill for the next steep part of the climb for the day. When you reach Vao, you are essentially halfway through day six of the English Way. 

Rob and Rich Pass Horreo, Walking Through Vao on day six of the Camino InglésRob and Rich Pass Horreo, Walking Through Vao

Within the town of Vao, we were directed to turn right onto yet another gravel road, to continue the climb up and back into the forest. 

Rob and Rich Climbing Out of Vao on day six of the Camino InglésRob and Rich Climbing Out of Vao

After turning up the hill in Vao, walk on for 1.25 kilometers of steep climbing on this gravel road. 

Rob and Rich on Gravel Lane on day six of the Camino InglésRob and Rich on Gravel Lane

The English Way is at least shaded through this narrow lane. This was a good thing since day six was becoming quite hot, despite it being early May!

Shady Lane on Day Six of the Camino InglésShady Lane on Day Six of the Camino Inglés
Rob and Steve Continue the Climb on day six of the Camino InglésRob and Steve Continue the Climb
The Climb Steepens on day six of the Camino InglésThe Climb Steepens
Long, Never-Ending Push on day six of the Camino InglésLong, Never-Ending Push Toward the Top
Pass By Old Chicken Houses on day six of the Camino InglésPass By Old Chicken Houses

We came to a T-intersection and took a right here at the 45.8 kilometer marker. 

Turn Right at 45.8 Kilometer Marker on Day Six of the Camino InglésTurn Right at 45.8 Kilometer Marker on Day Six of the Camino Inglés

We walked less than 100 meters, and turned left onto another rural lane, which opens up from the forest. 

Left Turn Onto This Open Lane on day six of the Camino InglésLeft Turn Onto This Open Lane

It is about 1/2 kilometer of steep climbing, after the prior turn, to a top-off area, seen ahead on the photo below. Almost there!

The Top is Ahead! on day six of the Camino InglésThe Top is Ahead!
The Sweeping View From the Top on day six of the Camino InglésThe Sweeping View From the Top
Rich and Rob Nearing the Top on day six of the Camino InglésLooking Back at Rich and Rob Nearing the Top

After reaching the summit, there is a brief downhill, shown below.

Short Downhill Reprieve on day six of the Camino InglésShort Downhill Reprieve on Day Six of the Camino Inglés

After the nice and brief downhill portion, there is another, final climb for the day that presents itself ahead. 

Yet Another, Final Climb for Day Six on  the Camino InglésYet Another, Final Climb for Day Six on the Camino Inglés

We were all moving well, even though it was a tiring climb, on day six of our Camino Inglés. We had plenty of time and a reservation in Ó Mesón do Vento, so aside from being eager to get to a café as noon approached, we had no worries. 

Rich and Rob Climbing the Final Stretch on day six of the Camino InglésRich and Rob Climbing the Final Stretch
The Top of Final Hill Ahead on day six of the Camino InglésThe Top of Final Hill Ahead

It is about 1.4 kilometers onward from the previous top until coming to a T-intersection. It is here that you turn right onto pavement, show below, towards the town of As Travesas. 

Right Turn on Pavement Toward As Travesas on day six of the Camino InglésRight Turn on Pavement Toward As Travesas

It is 200 meters on the paved road, when you come to the AC-542 in As Travesas, shown below. Turn left at this intersection. It is at this intersection, where the La Coruña Arm of the English Way joins the Ferrol Arm. 

Left Turn Here on AC-542 in As Travesas on day six of the Camino InglésLeft Turn Here on AC-542 in As Travesas

In just over 300 meters along the AC-542, we walked by the super friendly Bar Avelina, shown below. I highly recommend that you stop here and see the pilgrim's church, just across the street from the bar. This café and bar is the town hub and it is always hopping in the middle of the day.

Bar Casa Avelina in As Travesas on day six of the Camino InglésBar Casa Avelina in As Travesas, Day Six, Ferrol Arm of the Camino Inglés

The food is great, the proprietress is very friendly and the chapel, the Capela de San Roque is supported entirely by pilgrims. The proprietress and/or her daughter may ask you for a donation for the chapel. She will show you a basket full of envelopes, on which prior pilgrims have written their name and country of origin and where they have placed their individual donations. She will ask you also for your spare change.

It is fun to donate, and the proprietress will most likely want to show you the names of all the other pilgrims that have passed through in recent days. Even if you don't know Spanish, after reading this, you will understand! The proprietress speaks no English!

Take the time to tour this quaint chapel, if you can. It is worth your spare change!  This was our second stop here, as both arms of the English Way now come through As Travesas. The proprietress even recognized us! She furiously sorted through the envelopes in the basket to find our envelope from only a few days prior when we completed the La Coruña arm. 

If you want to see the church, ask for the key at the bar, from the proprietress. Rich even asked her if we could ring the church bell, which she allowed! Here are the three gents testing out the bell, in the next photo. It worked! If you are unfamiliar with San Roque, the patron saint of dogs, and his legend, click here

Rich, Steve and Rob Ringing the Bell at the Capela de San Roque in As Travesas on day six of the Camino InglésRich, Steve and Rob Ringing the Bell at the Capela de San Roque in As Travesas

The proprietress of the Bar Avelina came along with us to the chapel, to take our photo. If she is busy when you arrive, she may just give you the key for you to use yourself. 

Rob, Rich, Elle and Steve Inside the Capela de San Roque in As Travesas on day six of the Camino InglésRob, Rich, Elle and Steve Inside the Capela de San Roque

The proprietress of the bar gave us a huge motherly hug as we went to leave. She is the matron of the church, and perhaps the town as she cares for their needs at the counter of her establishment! We felt very loved and nurtured by her and were reluctant to continue on. 

It is a total of about 1.6 kilometers on the AC-542 through As Travesas. After our bellies were full of bocadillos (sandwiches) and café con leche (coffee with milk), we continued on down the AC-542 toward Hospital de Bruma. Just after the Bar Avelina, there is another blue information board. Just beyond the board is the sign, below, announcing that we were leaving As Travesas. 

Leaving As Travesas on the AC-542 on day six of the Camino InglésLeaving As Travesas on the AC-542

In another kilometer from the Bar Avelina, pass the electric substation of Mesón do Vento. 

Red Eléctrico de España on day six of the Camino InglésPass by Red Eléctrico de España on Day Six of the English Way

Then pass the 42.2 kilometer marker. Next pass the Repsol gas station. It is not very nice walking along this busy road. In the past the Ferrol arm of the English Way did not come through this highway. I felt it was unfortunate that it now does, but I couldn't complain about visiting the Bar Avelina and the pilgrim's church. 

Pass the Repsol Station on the AC-542 on day six of the Camino InglésPass the Repsol Station on the AC-542

After the gas station, turn left from the AC-542, shown below.

Left Turn Here From AC-542 on day six of the Camino InglésLeft Turn Here From AC-542

Just beyond the electrical substation is a bronze age site, called the Castro das Travesas or the Castro Hill Fort. We did not see this, but it may be worth a side trip if you are a history buff. Not much is left of the castro but the dirt mounds. Turn right immediately after the electric switching area to see the historical marker and mounds. 

After leaving the AC-542, you walk on this quiet country lane, shown below, and back into a forested area towards Bruma. If your destination is not the albergue, but one of the hotels in Mesón do Vento, you could continue straight on the AC-542 to reach the town. This will be a shortcut, rather than following the Camino to Hospital de Bruma.

Country Lane Toward Hospital de Bruma on day six of the Camino InglésCountry Lane Toward Hospital de Bruma

You will walk about one kilometer on the county lane until it ends at this T-intersection shown below, where you join the pavement by turning right, entering the town of Hospital de Bruma. We were close to completing our day six on the English Way!

Turn Onto Pavement in Hospital de Bruma on day six of the English WayTurn Onto Pavement in Hospital de Bruma

After you walk only a few meters, turn to the left, to walk through the town and towards the albergue. Walk by this lovely horreo. 

Walk by Horreo in Hospital de Bruma on day six of the English WayWalk by Horreo in Hospital de Bruma

After a short 1/2 kilometer, you will arrive at the Albergue de Hospital de Bruma. This beautiful old stone building can be quite cold in the cusp seasons, as I came to find out when I stayed here in September, four years prior. It has 26 beds, and fills up quickly in the high season. It also has a kitchen, but I never used it. 

Albergue de Hospital de Bruma on day six of the English WayAlbergue de Hospital de Bruma

After our prior three nights stay in an albergue, and since I didn't want to be cold that night in early May, we all decided it was time for a nice hotel and walked onward to the town of Ó Mesón do Vento, back on the AC-542. It is a 1.8 kilometer walk. 

We chose to stay in the family-run PR Ó Mesón Novo, show below. This was Rich and my room. We usually choose two single beds, because the doubles are quite small for his height, and he is more comfortable with the twins. 

Pensión Residencial Ó Mesón Novo on day six of the English WayPensión Residencial Ó Mesón Novo
Pensión Residencial Ó Mesón Novo on day six of the English WayPensión Residencial Ó Mesón Novo

If your day was very long, coming from Betanzos and you can't walk another 1.8 kilometers to Ó Mesón do Vento, call the hotels here and they will most certainly pick you up at the albergue! Click on the link to reserve and get their contact information. Bruma may be a pinch point, so if you know your dates, you may want to reserve here now. 

The family at the PR Ó Mesón Novo, was very helpful and friendly. The matron speaks excellent English, but the son did not. The best part is that they also run a café attached to the hotel, and since it is on a major road, it opens up at 0600 in the morning! Wonderful for a pilgrim getting an early start!

We obtained our very clean and comfortable rooms, cleaned up and had a nice long rest, meeting up at the hotel bar for a beer. When 6:00 p.m. rolled around we decided to hit the town to look for an open place for dinner. The information we had stated that the Ó Mesón Novo café served raciones at any time of the day. This was just not our experience. 

Sadly, none of the restaurants in Ó Mesón do Vento opened prior to 8:00 p.m. for dinner. We were disappointed in this, as we wanted to get to bed early and get an early start for our long day seven. We wanted to avoid as much of the midday sun as we could. 

After wasting some time at the bar at the Hotel Canaima, we went back to the Ó Mesón Novo café to see if they had tortilla or something else we could maybe eat in lieu of dinner. 

As we approached the café counter, and stared longingly at the tortilla, the matron of the place recognized hungry pilgrims instantly and said she could make us some plates. We sat down and shortly thereafter, a plate of tortilla (Spanish egg and potato casserole) arrived, followed by a plate of pimientos de Padrón (lovely little salty green peppers - a specialty of Galicia), then generous plates of delicious smoked ham and cheese, with bread, of course. 

We ate it all hungrily and washed it all down with delicious bottles of local red wine. I believe she charged the four of us about 33 Euro for plenty of food for us all! Incredible! We were happy satisfied pilgrims! 

When we discovered the café opened at six in the morning, we were even more thrilled with the Ó Mesón Novo! We would see them in the morning, for sure. 

Reflections on Day Six on the Camino Inglés

Day six was a beautiful and rural walk, through endless forests paths. This could feel lonely or it could be the solitude that you need. Regardless of your reception to this path, the hill climbing comprises the major part of the day.  

The mystery of why we climb hills I suppose can only be answered by each and every individual. For me, as with most pilgrims I imagine, indeed it is to get to Santiago de Compostela. The hill climbs are the necessary ingredient to get where we are going. Hmm. Sounds like life. 

However, for me, it is more than that. It is the accomplishment, the camaraderie with both our group members and the interaction from the locals. The loving care and open acceptance that we received was quite touching on this day. Yes, these locals benefited financially from us, however, they could have taken way more advantage of us. Plus we could have been greeted with jaded hearts instead of warm and kind ones. For this Camino spirit, I was most grateful.

Salutation

May your own day six on the Camino Inglés be filled with the warmth and care of the Spanish locals, to make your climb that much more enjoyable. May you ponder the mystery of why you climb at all! May your Camino be filled with answers to this perennial question! Ultreia!







** The new and improved version of our guide book, as of 8/2018, is now available to purchase. This digital eBook, in PDF format, now has all the the updates in the route changes that happened in 2017 and 2018! Click here for more information.





And the Journey Continues:

La Coruña Arm

Ferrol Arm




› Day Six on the Camino Inglés





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